Freedom and Independence Halted

Waterfalls against a lush back drop

A nomadic lifestyle may seem like a dream and for many, it is especially in the beginning, but there are some disadvantages to the nomadic life that become evident over time and more so now than ever before. Al and I have been living in our RV full-time for the past seven years, and we have a pretty good handle on the slew of emotions, good and bad, that come with living a nomadic life.

The life of an RV nomad is usually filled with a mixture of thoughts and emotions that will ebb and flow from day to day … excitement, dreamy, adventurous, rewarding … along with challenging, uncertainty, and fear. Let’s add in a worldwide pandemic and those challenges, uncertainties, and fear are taken to a whole new level.

a sidewalk meandering through a desert landscape. Social distancing.
No problem social distancing when I take my morning walks.

Shelter in Place – Stay at Home – Social Distance

Those are new phrases that many of us have never used or used on any sort of regular basis prior to March of 2020. These days, stay at home, shelter in place or social distancing are phrases we hear routinely on a daily basis. We’re living in a new reality that has brought to light a major disadvantage for those living a nomadic life.

We’ve seen our favorite nomad YouTuber’s stuck in foreign countries or scrambling to get back home … wherever they consider home. We’ve seen our fellow RV nomads posting on Facebook and RV forums asking for help in finding a spot to shelter in place. Across the United States, campgrounds and public lands are closing left and right and in the process canceling reservations that full-time RVers were counting on as a place to live. RVers are told to return home. The problem for a full-time RVer is they have no physical home to return to. Home is where we park it. So, where are these full-time nomads expected to shelter-in-place?

a bee on a purple wildflower

Fear and uncertainty

When local governments started ordering non-essential businesses to close, that included campgrounds – public and private. Apparently, no one took into consideration the million or so Americans that live in their RVs full-time.

With the help of several RV organizations, a few state governments were flooded with pleas, and fortunately, we’ve seen either a rule reversal or a little leniency regarding the essential need for private RV Parks to remain open.

home is where your honey isThe situation varies from state to state and here in Arizona, the rules aren’t as strict or cut and dry as in other states.

Sure the Grand Canyon is currently closed to all visitors, but private RV Parks throughout Arizona are open and left to make their own judgment call in regards to accepting new guests.

Also, most BLM  (government-owned) land in Arizona is still available as a place for RVers to hunker down.

Considering Arizona is such an RV friendly state with a huge population of full-time RVers living here half the year, I believe our local government is well aware of these facts and realize cutting off RV access would not solve anything but rather cause a whole new problem.

In addition, many of these private RV Parks in Arizona and Florida have year-round residents. Some of these folks live in Park Models while others in an RV. Asking folks to leave an RV Resort would be tantamount to asking anyone in a traditional subdivision that they’d have to move out of their house.

So, since Al and I rent an annual lot, we weren’t in any jeopardy of not having a place to shelter or ‘stay at home‘, and we’ll stay home in Phoenix until we’re told it’s safe to travel again. But many of our RV friends aren’t as lucky and are scrambling to find a solution. No one wants to be the cause of spreading this virus any more than it already has and most full-time RVers aren’t traveling unless forced to by circumstances.

We’ve seen the good in people when complete strangers offer up shelter to those in need. Whether it’s a room in a house or a driveway or piece of land to park the RV, these stories are heartwarming. We’ve also seen the not so good from rude individuals posting nasty comments on social media (biz as usual for some, I guess). But overall, good seems to prevail during this time of crisis.

Freedom and Independence

Pinterest pin, lone tree in grassy meadow, inspirationMost of us choose the RV lifestyle to immerse ourselves in a sense of freedom and independence. We long to discover the country’s deepest secrets and hidden gems. We strive to capture the perfect landscape photo and/or Instagram selfie (guilty of both). After all, it’s the stuff dreams are made of … trading in the traditional nine-to-five routine for a freewheeling, wind in your hair kind of carefree lifestyle – a lifestyle of freedom.

Freedom: the absence of constraint in choice or action. The state of being free, independent, without restrictions.

For RVers, freedom usually means having the ability to go wherever whenever one chooses. We live independently on our terms. We’re adventurers, explorers, and out of the box thinkers.

But what happens when we’re told we can no longer move freely about? What does our life begin to look like? We’re not the kind of people to linger in one spot long enough for the grass to grow under our feet, but we’re living in uncertain times and unchartered waters and the wheels need to stop rolling. Some RVers have found a place to ride this unconventional storm out while others are still struggling and wondering where they can park for the foreseeable future. We’re all in this together and trying to find a new normal.

First weeks of ‘social distancing’ followed by a ‘stay at home’ order

What is normal during a pandemic? I spent the better part of March binge-watching stuff on my computer accompanied by feelings of denial, surreal, and WTF. Now in my defense, I’ll remind everyone that I was extremely ill during the month of February and it took most of March for me to regain my energy. Hey, when I get sick, I get sick, no mild stuff for this gal…. sigh! With that said, I still have an occasional cough that freaks people out every now and then. (always uses arm to cover mouth 😷)

cactus blossom

Yep, it’s just an annoying cough. I’ve been to the doctor, had a CT scan, followed up with other medical stuff and I’m perfectly fine … finer than frog’s hair. Ever since I had Valley Fever a few years ago, I’m more susceptible to coughing than the typical person.

And now that I’ve flipped the calendar to April, I feel renewed, one might even say normal, whatever that is these days. Yeah, the world is still turned upside down, but my energy has returned and instead of being a blob on the couch, I’m once again a productive human being, well kind of. I’ve managed to stock up on way too many groceries, filling every nook and cranny in the RV. I have enough toilet paper, paper towels and kleenex to last us for the next six months. (I am sharing and not hoarding, just so y’all know)

I’ve been having fun in the kitchen playing around with new recipes and getting in some much-needed exercise so I don’t pack on the pounds with my tasty experiments. Life is slow and relaxing at the moment. Life has its stressful moments, but I have confidence that we’ll get through this.

I’m not sure how different life will look on the other side. I do have concerns, especially for the rising unemployment. Al and I know what’s it’s like to have bills, a mortgage, and a couple of small children and lose our income unexpectedly. That’s not a situation I’d wish on my worst enemy, and yet, millions of people around the globe are experiencing this unfortunate dilemma. Tourism in Arizona has been especially hit hard and many of our acquaintances are out of work … temporarily, I hope. My heart aches for these folks!

Arizona Biltmore Resort, Scottsdale, Arizona
Arizona Biltmore Resort, Scottsdale, AZ – temporarily closed

Every time I visit the grocery store, Walmart, or the RV dealer for parts (time to tend to those RV repairs), I thank the folks for working and make sure I stand as far away from them as possible. I keep those outings few and far between with hopes we can stop this virus from lingering or spreading any further.

Hitch itch and that desire to get those wheels rolling onto some new scenery are starting to settle in for many of us. I’m in dire need of a new landscape to photograph, but until we can hit the road, I’ll focus on cooking, taking advantage of this slow pace of life, and doing my part binge-watching something.

Stay safe and healthy, my friends. Remember,
alcohol kills germs.😀

survival supply store. liquor store. Total Wine and more
I visit the survival supply store and stock up!

(These are affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for your support ❤)

Margarita & Slush Machine, Makes 1 Gallon of Drinks
Puzzle: 2000 Wonderful World
PURELL Hand Sanitizing Wipes

92 thoughts on “Freedom and Independence Halted

  1. The conundrum of full timers needing to shelter in place is such a real thing. We had 10 rigs volunteering/building with us here when the pandemic hit and 4 of them needed to stay through last week! Lucky for (all of us), the Habitat affiliate owns this lot with the hookups so they had a place to go- otherwise they literally wouldn’t have had a place to hunker down. We had to stay anyway because I’m still working but I for one am certainly looking forward to traveling again once my job duties are finished!

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    1. Yes, these are definitely challenging times for full-time RVers and I don’t see it changing or easing up this year. Glad to hear you have a place to hunker down. We’re fortunate we have family property to spend our summer on in northern WI because reservations anywhere are already impossible. I’m not sure how much exploring we’ll be able to do.

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  2. Great post and excellent photography. As a fellow gypsy traveler, although without the RV, the public lands closures have left me between a rock and a hard place, too. Don’t want to spread the virus 4,000 miles to Alaska, but running out of options at this point. Thanks for the tip on AZ BLM land.

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    1. Thank you, and yes, it is a little tough out there right now for full-time nomads. Fortunately, AZ kept a lot of land open for RVers, but with temps soaring, it’ll be tough to find a place that isn’t hotter than heck. Unfortunately, Grand Canyon is closed but temps would be perfect there. Fingers crossed you can head north soon.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I’m feeling optimistic that we’ll be able to hit the road in June. I guess, time will tell! Fortunately for us, we’ll be heading to family property and won’t need a res.

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    1. We are doing quite well, thank you, and hope you are as well. Yes, the life of a full-time RVer is very challenging for some at the moment. And we have plenty of alcohol around the RV to kill any germs 🤣🍹😋

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  3. These are strange times…I’d never considered what might happen for RVers.Glad you have a place to hunker down and be safe. I do LOVE your photographs – especially the waterfall photo at the top. I am so glad to have come across your site – you photos and stories inspire me and my wanderlust. Have a wonderful day and stay safe and well. Peace.

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    1. Thank you Clay. We are indeed fortunate. Hope you continue to enjoy your time at the lake house. Oh, and the waterfall image was taken a few years back at the Japanese Garden in Rockford, IL. If you’ve never been, you should … it’s beautiful and known as one of the best in the country!

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  4. A huge WOW, on where you take your morning walks, Ingrid. I much prefer your phrase “new reality” versus “new normal.” I am balking at the word, “normal.”

    This is definitely an unprecedented and unique challenge. “Freedom” is an interesting concept right now for everyone. I am very with you, Ingrid, on how “We’re all in this together and trying to find a new normal.” I enjoy all of your photos. Your very last photo made me break out in a huge smile. 🙂 Thank you for giving me a glimpse into your present life. Hugs and stay well!

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    1. Unfortunately, I believe ‘normal’ might not look normal for the rest of the year. But time will tell. For now, I take great joy in my walks surrounded by blooms. Although my nose isn’t currently happy about our landscape in full bloom 🤧 Al and I are both fighting allergies but I’ll take it. It’s too pretty to complain about. Wishing you and yours continued good health 🌵🌸🌼

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  5. Beautiful photos, Ingrid. And, that last one is great as well! We could all use a drink right now. I’d love to be in Arizona one year when the spring flowers emerge. What a wonderful path for your daily walks.

    We are “sheltering in place” at a free campground without any services, in a nature reserve in South Carolina. Now that we found a decent spot (for a little while), we are happier. But, because of all the campground closures, dump stations and drinking water are hard to come by. Extra challenges that – hopefully – can get overcome. I’m sure it’s easier to boondock out West right now. Well, it always is, actually. And, more inspiring too. 🙂

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    1. I’m sure it’s challenging for anyone not booked at an RV Park long term. I know our park stopped accepting new guests a week ago. I’m so glad we have this site to stay as long as we want. We won’t leave until all restrictions throughout the country have been lifted. Thank goodness, we have an upgraded A/C unit in case we have to stay longer than we’d like.
      Stay safe! Oh, and the desert is indeed beautiful when the landscape is covered in wildflowers.

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    1. Nothing worse than being ill when there’s a fun to-do list to explore. And now that I’m better, there’s a ‘stay at home’ order in place LOL. Hmm, no excuse not to tackle those RV projects 😏

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  6. Ingrid you bring up such good points. I had not released there was such a large number of RV dwellers who are nomadic. I’m glad to hear that the community is helping one another and that you find yourself in a stable situation. I’m sorry to hear you have been so ill but glad you have been thoroughly checked out. Stay well friend.

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    1. And that full-time RV number did not take into account all the Canadians that also live this lifestyle. The majority (if not all) of our Canadian RVers had to hightail it back north across the border when they were given short notice of health insurance changes. Talk about scrambling! Life is certainly crazy right now.

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  7. A non RV’ing friend posted about the stay at home orders, someone, who turns out to be an RV dreamer, commented about RV’s still out traveling. I mentioned what trying times these are for the RV’ing community with all of us trying to find a place to shelter for a while. Not only has our lot been a great investment, they’re starting at 189k now, but it also gives a place to run to when they close the park and our site is free. All those who were here when they shut the park down could stay but no new RVs were allowed. Thankful we made a mad dash here. I hope we can get to IL in May. Stay safe, miss you guys!!

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    1. So many people don’t understand the complexity of a nomadic lifestyle. One guy on a forum said he didn’t understand the whining and RVers needed to return to the address on their driver’s license. 🤦‍♀️ Could you imagine the parking lots of mailing forwarding services packed with RVs? Some folks just don’t get it!
      We’re hunkered down in ‘our place’ and I’m glad you guys are doing the same at ‘your place’. Wish we could’ve shared our pizza with you yesterday … with proper social distancing, of course 😆😘😋

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    1. Thank you Renee, we’re doing great and taking full advantage of a slow-paced, low-key life at the moment. Hope you are doing the same and staying healthy 😊

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  8. Hi, Ingrid,
    I would LOVE to see a blooming saguaro but, for now, we’re hunkered down at home and working on home projects that we put off too long. So far I’ve cleaned out two closets, cleaned and stained our deck, and waxed our fifth-wheel…then I went to Total Wine. Hopefully, we’ll get back through Arizona in late September–“hitch itch” is a very real affliction. Stay well. Joe

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    1. Sometimes it’s a good thing to be forced to stay home … we no longer have an excuse to put off that ‘honey-do’ list. We’re finally tackling some RV repairs that we’ve been neglecting. Hey, when duct tape works, why mess with perfection? 😆 Enjoy your downtime and purchases from Total Wine and we’ll do the same. Cheers!

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  9. Meeting a lot of new RV people these past couple months in FL and feeling the need to stay connected through this pandemic, I’ve heard many personal stories of despair on not being able to find a campground to go to along the east coast. I can understand the closings of east coast campgrounds. In so many of them, you’re packed in like sardines and people were not social distancing. It was party on as usual, beaches flooded. But those that offer larger lots/distance inbetween could be life-savers for many who full-time, so a shame these cannot be open for those in need. Although we luckily have an RV lot in a remote area in upcountry SC to hunker down in for now from our wintering in FL, I wish we could go home to Maryland. Just to scared/worried to, and our kids say we’re safer to stay where we’re at. So be it.

    A story to laugh at, Rick was going through our motorhome’s basement storage and found 2 8-packs of RV toilet paper hidden. OMGosh, we were so damn happy with this find, it was like finding gold!! 😅

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    1. TP hidden? You found treasure or an immunity idol 🤣 (ok, too much “Survivor” watching over here). I’m so glad Al and I contracted for an annual lot giving us that ‘home base’ we were longing for. I think more and more full-time RVers will look for either raw land or something similar. This has been an eye-opening experience for many … me included!
      Take care and hope you continue to give your camera a good working out at your SC location!

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    1. And you certainly have a beautiful place to hunker down surrounded by wildlife. I’m sure with this extra downtime, you’ll make huge progress tackling all those projects. Take care!

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  10. I hadn’t really thought about the implications of campgrounds and parks closing in relation to how RV’ers would stay in place. Thanks for writing about it.
    I’m glad you are feeling better, and hope you stay well and safe.
    Cheers, Amy

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    1. Thank you Amy, we’re doing well and glad we have a place to call ‘home’. Hope you are able to implement your move back to the U.S. in a safe and timely manner. Challenging times!

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    1. There is a new reality at the moment and it’ll be interesting to see what life looks like on the other side. I sure hope I won’t have to spend the summer living in a tin can during a desert summer, but if I do, at least I have a strong A/C unit 🌵

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    1. It is definitely a challenging time as you well know. I need to work on writing down some of my kitchen experiments so I can share, and more importantly, so I remember what I did.🤣 Cheers to you and Steve and your new status as ‘grandparents’. 🥂

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  11. You bring up many interesting points! It seems pretty typical of governments to quickly enact something without thinking of the broader implications.
    As soon as Canada issued the advisory against all non-essential travel outside of Canada, a number of medical insurance providers advised their out of country clients that their coverage would end in 10 days. That meant many ‘snowbirds’ in the USA had to scramble to get back to Canada. If they were RV nomads like you, they had to figure out where they could live in Canada until winter was done!

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    1. I knew back in March about the Canadian health insurance problem as most of our Canadian RVing friends were hightailing it north which is why I was so surprised that you were still in the valley. Once they crossed the border, they were told to quarantine/shelter-in-place for 14 days which was extremely challenging for many. Crazy times! Hope you have no problems returning north. Safe travels and stay healthy!

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  12. Tough times indeed Ingrid. The situation for those permanently on the road here in Australia is much the same. Though I did read that the state of Western Australia will keep its caravan parks open, however that is probably sensible as it would take people too long to get back to the eastern half of the country where the majority of our population normally resides. We’re hunkered down at home and looking lovingly at our caravan. In the mean time there are a million photos to sort, new recipes to try and Netflix. But you know it’s hard to imagine what’s over the next hill when you can’t see over the fence. Take care and stay healthy.

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    1. Yeah, this is a worldwide crisis that will have a lasting impact for quite some time. Glad you have a home to hunker down and wait this out. We too will be staying put on our lot in Phoenix until we feel it’s safe to travel. Let’s hope that’s sooner rather than later. Stay safe and healthy!

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    1. Yes, this is a perfect example why having a homebase is ideal. I’m one of the rare full-time RVers that won’t promote full-timing and usually do my best to talk folks out of it and rather promote part-time. We’re still in search of that slice of land we’d like to call ‘home’. Wishing you and your family continued good health!

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  13. Glad you have this place to hunker down at… feel so bad for those that don’t.

    We are doing well and just praying for the day this all ends!

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    1. I know you have that beautiful backyard to hang out until we’re all able to travel to our summer ‘homes’. I guess the upside to staying in Phoenix longer is we get to see the saguaro blooming … a special treat. Cheers to hoping this crisis ends soon. 🍹🌵😎

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  14. I have assurances from the owners and residents of the private RV Park where I happened to land that they will not toss me out. They redefined me as a permanent resident.
    These are exciting times.

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  15. Great post and it captures the concerns of many full-timers. Arizona is very RVer friendly and we are grateful for that. We had thought about finding a remote boondocking spot and staying by ourselves but finally decided it was best to find a private campground so we could stay put as long as needed and not have to move. We feel fortunate as we are used to small spaces with big backyards.

    Glad to hear you are doing so much better. Continue that trend!

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    1. I think you made a wise choice to find a private park to stay until this craziness lifts. And the weather around Camp Verde/Cottonwood is more agreeable this time of year than Phoenix. Oh, it’s still really nice here, but that’ll change soon.
      Which direction do you think you’ll head when it’s safe to travel? You guys enjoy that part of Arizona and stay safe and healthy.

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      1. We really like this area and Prescott too. I am sure we will enjoy.
        Later, if we can, will probably go north to WY or MT. We were going to attend the Escapee Escapade in WY but that has been canceled already. We always go to Portland, OR at the end of the summer so if this lasts a long time we may just head up that way instead. The Oregon coast is nice, as are places in the Cascades such as Bend, OR.
        All the plans that we had made are no longer valid and it currently impossible to make any new ones now. We always try to be flexible.
        Take care and stay healthy!

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        1. We spent two summers hanging around Prescott and the surrounding area putting it on the shortlist for a place to settle down. Nice weather, acceptable landscape, and plenty of things for us to do. Although we really enjoyed our stays and made great friends, boredom or possibly hitch itch eventually set in. Safe travels north and let’s hope we’re able to roll sooner rather than later. 🙂

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  16. Wow. I hadn’t considered RVers until I read this…since I don’t know any personally (besides the occasional vacation RVer). I’m glad you’re doing good and getting your energy back. I was telling hubby the other day that allergies are starting my eyes watering and light asthma induced cough occasionally as my lungs don’t get enough air in spring due to pollen…and it is a terrible time to be anything other than completely healthy. Everyone automatically assumes you have corona virus. Even when I walk out in the empty desert by my home to get outside, I feel guilty if I sneeze or blow my nose. But keep your head up. We’ll get through this.

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    1. Hi Char, yeah it can feel a little daunting visiting the store when one of my little coughing spells rears its ugly head. People turn and stare with an evil eye. Fortunately, I have no need to venture out much. We are overstocked with supplies to the point I have boxes and cans shoved under the table and chairs and any other free spot in this RV. Quite funny that I’m doing well tolerating the extra clutter which is uncharacteristic of me.
      Take care of those allergies and always nice hearing from you 🌵

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    1. Thank you S. Being sick is never fun, but I think it’s even more difficult when living in an RV. So glad you two made it back to Canada and have a lovely spot to hunker down near family.

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    1. Hi Amy. Oh, how I wish we could get together for a cup of coffee and catch up. It has been way too long. If we can’t get together before we leave for WI, let’s plan in October when I return to the valley. You guys stay healthy and thank you for thinking of me!

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  17. It is so good to hear that the state and local governments in Arizona are taking fulltime RVers into consideration when making these decisions. I feel terrible for the people in other states who are suddenly having to scramble, with nowhere to go. As unexpected as all of this was, I certainly never expected states to start closing down access to public lands and state parks. What a crazy, crazy time we are living in. As you said, it went from “denial to surreal to WTF?” LOL.

    In the meantime, it’s great that you have a reliable spot to stay in for as long as you need it – just one more benefit to having a home base. Stay well!

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    1. We love having a ‘home base’ even if it’s just a lot we rent. It’s our spot and not available to anyone else. As you know when we met in Lake Havasu City, we were on a quest to find a place. We just weren’t sure what we wanted and so glad none of the houses we put contracts in on didn’t work. We realized, we prefer being closer to our children and a major city and this park is working out perfectly, especially now.
      Hope you guys are doing well in the Airbnb and can wait it out there as long as needed, but you’re probably antsy to get back to the RV. Take care!

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  18. Hi Ingrid. Glad you are feeling better. We will be happy to do our part and visit Arizona again whenever it is possible. We really want to see Monument Valley, Page, and Phoenix again. We even miss going to the beach since it is closed. We are all doing our part, and look forward to the day when this is all in the past. Take care and stay well!

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    1. I share your desire to visit those northern Arizona places … some of my absolute favorite spots in the US. This too shall pass, and before we know it, we’ll all be back out exploring. Stay safe!

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  19. I wonder. When home is the road, and you staying at home being on the road? Great post, Ingrid.

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    1. Haha! I’m so confused 😏. I recently heard that full-time RVers are considered “homeless” and thus there have been some exceptions to the rules. The problem stemmed from the onset when schools were initially canceled and families viewed this as vacation and an opportunity to go camping.😣

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      1. No school = vacation? Messes things up for you. I guess you are a high-end homeless. Laurie’s now creating online classes. Some of the students think online classes are vacation also.

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          1. Online classes need a lot of planning. Forcing teachers and students into so quickly creates a lot of problems. But that’s that case for a lot of last minute things lately.

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  20. Wow, you bring up pertinent point for full time RVers, Ingrid! Social distance isn’t important but more so for many RVers who tend to be older. I’m glad to read Arizona and Florida, known as retirement states, allow for full time nomads. An excellent post! Love your pics…saw your IG post today of you fixing your skylight…you look pretty handy with the tools! I showed Hans your shot of Total Wine, we both had a good chuckle. Hope you and Al are staying safe!

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    1. Yeah, who would’ve thought RV parks would be ordered to close to temporary guests? The skylight job is complete. Next week we’ll tackle one of three roof vents that need replacing. We don’t want to rush the process and will tackle one a week 🤣 We have more paper products and alcohol stashed throughout this RV than ever before. It’s rather comical. Don’t want to run out of essentials, ya know!

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  21. Ingrid, this is such a great post. I’m so glad you and Al don’t have to worry about where to park your RV during this time. I’ve been thinking a lot about how much I miss the freedom to come and go where I want. It’s been three weeks now for us and there are more restrictions and business closures than in the beginning. We will get through this together!

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    1. It is definitely a crazy time right now. We are happy to be parked in familiar territory near family and will stay until it’s safe to travel. Thank goodness we have a strong A/C unit if we have to stay in Phoenix into June. I know you have a beautiful home and garden making it easier to shelter-in-place even if you miss the ability to travel. I always look forward to your garden floral images. Take care!

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  22. We’ve been incredibly lucky in that nothing is very different for us. We are hunkered down in the desert on BLM ground, waiting it all out. Thankfully the weather has stayed moderate, and not blazing hot so that is a plus. We will have to head back north very soon. Back to our shop/studio and get some art pieces done. This whole thing has blown our world all to pieces though. No art shows, means no money for us and we are really hoping that summer shows will still happen. We were going to get a different RV this spring, but that is for sure on hold.

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    1. So glad to hear you’ve found a place to hunker down. I’m hoping life can return to some form of normalcy by June 1st. That might be optimistic, but folks/we need to get back to work. We too have been talking about a different RV, but like you, that’ll get put on hold. What kind of RV do you think you’ll get (when the time works)?

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  23. this is a great post. i had wondered what you would do. I hope you and yours continue to be safe…

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      1. That’s great to read and hear. Yes we are fine. I am working sporadically at the office and home for the rest of the time making quick visits to the store when necessary. Walks when I can.

        My older siblings wish I wouldn’t go to work because of the compromised immune system but no one else is there to do the job. I am trying as hard as possible to do what is necessary.

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  24. Great Post Ingrid ! I’ll have to learn more about Valley Fever. You both stay healthy please…..
    Love, Darla

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    1. Thanks Darla. I can certainly brief you on Valley Fever since Logan and I experienced it personally. We look forward to seeing you soon. Safe travels! ❤

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