The Little Things

It’s Wandering Wednesday again and today’s photo theme prompt is – the little things.

dragonfly

A while back, I went hiking with a friend …. a non photographer friend, and although I left my camera behind (I know, what was I thinking ūü§£) that didn’t stop me from looking around and noticing all the potential photo compositions along with all the less than obvious little things, but things that are still photo worthy.

Through the Lens

Looking at life through the lens of my camera has taught me to be more observant. I guess I hadn’t realized this fact until my non-photographer hiking companion commented, “I can’t believe all the little things you notice. If you hadn’t pointed out these things, I never would’ve seen the interesting rocks, leaves, flowers or bugs”.

barbed wire morning fog

noticing the little details – dew dripping off barbed wire on a foggy morning

Do you see things that you’re friends don’t?

I know I do. What’s interesting though is when I’m out on an adventure or hike with a fellow photographer, it’s not uncommon for each of us to point out different photo-ops. It’s always fun comparing photographs after a photographic outing with a friend.

Artistic vision is definitely an individual matter, and we all notice and see things in a different way.

wildflowers at Craters of the Moon National Monument, Idaho

Tiny delicate wildflowers at Craters of the Moon National Monument, ID

For this weeks Wandering Wednesday theme …

Let’s share photographs of the little things we see. Things that aren’t initially in your face obvious. Things that take a moment of observation to discover. Little things we notice because we look at life through the lens of a camera …. a camera that has helped us see the little things that perhaps our friends don’t notice. Maybe its a unique center piece at a restaurant, or a pattern in the sand, or maybe you stumbled upon an interesting bug or nest.

Share a photograph of something little, something less obvious, something that took you a moment of observance to see.

Wandering Wednesday – Ingrid’s Photo Inspirations

Each Wednesday I post a different photo prompt as a way for bloggers to share their love of photography and engage with other like minded bloggers. Perhaps this prompt will serve as a little inspiration to pick up the camera in search of a composition or a reason to go through your photo archives. Whether you shoot with your phone, a DSLR or something in-between, don’t be shy ūü§ó share those photos!

Upcoming prompts – Food, Landscapes, Garden …. get out and shoot or peruse those archives!

dragonfly

photography

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JOBY GorillaPod SLR Zoom
Hiking Waist Pack

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Sunsets – A Photo Prompt

I’m not sure if I prefer sunrises or sunsets …. both can be pretty spectacular and can offer either the perfect way to start the day or the perfect way to end a day.

sunset over Lake Pleasant Arizona

Lake Pleasant, Arizona

Yeah, I’d say enjoying happy hour while watching the sun set is a pretty darn good way to end a day. Can you think of a better way?

Sunset at San Diego California

San Diego, California

Wandering Wednesday Photo Theme – Sunset

Join me for this weeks photo challenge by sharing photographs of Sunsets.

sunset at the beach

Copano Bay, Texas Gulf Coast

We’d love to see YOUR sunset photos. So let’s share and connect … join in and share a link in the comments below or link back to this blog in your own post.

Split Rock Lighthouse Lake Havasu Arizona

Split Rock Lighthouse replica – Lake Havasu, Arizona

Wandering Wednesday – Ingrid’s Inspirations

Each Wednesday I post a different photo prompt as a way for bloggers to share their love of photography and engage with other like minded bloggers. Perhaps this prompt will serve as a little inspiration to pick up the camera in search of a composition or a reason to go through your photo archives. Whether you shoot with your phone, a DSLR or something in-between, don’t be shy ūü§ó share your photos!

Upcoming prompts – the Little Things, Food, Landscapes, Garden, Birds …. get out and shoot or peruse those archives!

(affiliate links)
 Portable Camping Chair
Unbreakable Stemless Wine Glasses

Patriotic

It’s the fourth of July in the United States of America and time for barbecues and fireworks.

We think of July 4th as Independence Day…. the day¬†that represents the birth of the United States of¬†America¬†as an independent nation. The Continental Congress declared independence on July 2, 1776 but July 4, 1776 was the actual day that they¬†approved the final wording of the Declaration of Independence.

How did the Fourth of July become a national holiday in the United States of America?

In 1817, John Adams complained that America seemed uninterested in its past. After the War of 1812, the Federalist party began to come apart and the new parties of the 1820s and 1830s all considered themselves inheritors of Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans.

In an attempt to increase interest in past history, printed copies of the Declaration were circulated with the date July 4, 1776, listed at the top.

The deaths of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams on July 4, 1826, may have even helped to promote the idea of July 4th as being an important date to remember.

biplane

Celebrations of the Fourth of July became more common as the years went on. In 1870, Congress declared July 4th to be a national holiday as part of a bill to officially recognize several holidays including Christmas.

Wandering Wednesday Photo Prompt

For today’s photo theme, let’s share patriotic photographs. Think ¬†flags, fireworks, red, white and blue, or any other image that represents patriotic to you. Share and connect!

Phoenix

The¬†Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza¬†is a park located in front of the¬†Arizona¬†state capitol¬†complex in downtown¬†Phoenix, Arizona. It’s home to several¬†memorials¬†honoring prominent figures in Arizona history as well as memorializing significant¬†wars¬†and other events that have affected the state.

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Wandering Wednesday – Ingrid’s Photo Inspirations

Each Wednesday I post a different photo prompt as a way for bloggers to share their love of photography and engage with other like minded bloggers. Perhaps this prompt will serve as a little inspiration to pick up the camera in search of a composition or a reason to go through your photo archives. Whether you shoot with your phone, a DSLR or something in-between, don’t be shy ūü§ó share those photos!

Upcoming prompts – Sunsets, Food, Landscapes, Garden …. get out and shoot or peruse those archives!

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(affiliate links)

USA Flags
Mens t-shirt 
Womens 4th of July American Flag Shirt

 

Flowers

I don’t know about you, but I love flowers. They bring a smile to my face, and have a way of brightening up my day.

flower gardens in Denver Colorado

Denver, Colorado

I used to enjoy gardening when we lived in a sticks and bricks home, but living a nomadic life isn’t conducive to gardening. So to fulfill my passion for flowers, I enjoy visiting public gardens of all kinds as well as seek out fields of wildflowers in nature wherever I can.

roses

Wandering Wednesday Photo inspiration

For this weeks photo inspiration, prompt, challenge, theme (still haven’t decided what to call this ūü§£) …. let’s share images of flowers.

Wandering Wednesday ….

Next weeks photo theme is – Patriotic and the following Wednesday will be – Food.¬†¬†Start searching through your archives or get out there and shoot. Let’s share and connect!

(affiliate links)
Garden Tools Set
Collapsible & Expandable Plastic Vase
Set of 3 Reusable Grocery Bags

Wandering Wednesday – Water

With temperatures heating up and an abundance of sunshine gracing the skies, it’s time to hit the water. I love hanging around a picturesque lake or soft sandy ocean beach. I’m not the greatest swimmer, but I do enjoy and embrace all kinds of boating. You’ll even see me jump at the chance to float down a meandering river on an inner tube … throw in some tiny rapids, and the ten year old within me will emerge complete with giggles and screams.

Oh yeah, I never tire of the sight of a beautiful body of water!

reflection at the Grand Tetons Wyoming

Grand Tetons, Wyoming

Considering nearly 40% of the United States population live in coastal counties, counties directly on the shoreline, I’d say I’m not alone in my passion for water.

Jackson Lake Grand Tetons Wyoming

Jackson Lake – Grand Tetons, Wyoming

Photo inspiration

For this weeks photo inspiration … theme … challenge (whatever we want to call it) I’ve chosen WATER. Let’s share some favorite water images.

Lake Havasu Arizona sunset

sunset over Lake Havasu, Arizona

San Diego cruise ship pulling into port

San Diego – cruise ship pulling into port

From my archives

Digging through my archives I came across a couple of old photos that brought back fond memories ….

Boundary Waters Canoe Area northern Minnesota Canoe trip

Canoeing – Boundary Waters Canoe Area – northern Minnesota

We loved our canoe trips to northern Minnesota …. especially to Gunflint Lake which is located north of the town of Grand Marais and Lake Superior. I wish the quality of this photograph was better. If you look close, our 2 year old daughter is sitting between my legs while our 4 year old son sits in the center of the canoe. The white blob behind our son is our first Brittany Spaniel dog, Dallas … great dog who loved these adventures.

We started these camping / canoeing vacations to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area years before we had children. Once the children arrived, they added another element and joy to our adventures and never stopped us from embarking on these excursions.

open bow boat

I loved this little boat – so many fun times spent out on the water. Me driving while Bear sits behind me.

Horsetooth reservoir Fort Collins Colorado

I’m not sure who enjoyed the boat rides more – Bear or me!

Share and connect …

Feel free to join in – comment and share your “water” photos!

Upcoming prompts to keep in mind …

  • Next Wednesday – Flowers
  • the following Wednesday – Patriotic (think fireworks, picnic, flags, etc)
  • then – Food
Lake Powell

Lake Powell

(affiliate links)
 Inflatable Sport Kayak

Beach Chair with Storage Pouch and Towel Bar

Waiting for the Sun to Set

I had a fabulous week boondocking in the Kaibab National Forest. After spending four months in a RV Resort in Prescott, Arizona, it felt fantastic to get the RV rolling, and camp by ourselves in a forest of soaring pine trees. We found a lovely slice of land to call home, and it was only fifteen minutes down the road from the south rim of the Grand Canyon.

sunset at the Grand Canyon

me waiting for the sun to set at the Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon camping

Our ‘home’ for the week. Aaahhh, can you smell the fresh scent of pine?

Although it did take a little effort on my part to leave the solitude of my beautiful campsite, I did venture up to the Grand Canyon a few times for photo ops. Most of the time, Al chose to stay at camp. He’s not a fan of the Grand Canyon nor of the hoards of tourists. I never mind venturing off on my own especially when hubby has a roaring campfire waiting for me upon my return.

sunset at the Grand Canyon

Lots of tourists from around the world waiting for the sun to set at the Grand Canyon – a storm is brewing

south rim of the Grand Canyon

south rim of the Grand Canyon

While I, along with hundreds of other people, waited for the sun to set at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, a storm started brewing. I could hear thunder in the distance and see an occasional flash of lightening.

south rim of the Grand Canyon

The approaching storm along with some lingering smoke haze from forest fires in the west made for a very interesting sky.

stormy sky at the Grand Canyon

stormy sky at the Grand Canyon

stormy sunset at the Grand Canyon

The sunset was definitely worth waiting around for, and the stormy sky added a touch of drama. I’m glad I pulled myself away from camp to experience the beauty of the Grand Canyon at sunset as a storm approaches. Yep, worth the wait!

sunset at Kaibab National Forest

This was the sky back at camp!

 

Unusual Neighborhood

Gosh, I can’t believe the summer is half over. When Al and I decided to slow our travels down this summer and sit in one spot for several months, I thought for sure I’d have trouble with the stationary stay. The norm for me is to have hitch itch set in … ants in my pants … gotta move thing … going on after thirty days.

watson lake Prescott Arizona

It’s monsoon season in Prescott, Arizona – makes for dramatic and unusual skies

Perhaps it’s the landscape or the attractive town of Prescott or most likely the combo of the two that has held my attention. The enjoyable stay has Al and me actually contemplating the Prescott, Arizona, area as a ‘home base‘. Time will tell!

camping in Prescott Arizona

RV Fairgrounds – a bit on the unusual side – different

And speaking of home base, allow me share our¬†RV park. We’ve been spending the summer camped at the Yavapai County RV Fairgrounds in Prescott Valley, Arizona. It’s definitely not your typical RV Park. The park is a mixed bag of folks; some living here year round, some staying a few months at a time (like us), and those just passing through.

Even though there is predator a common building with a laundry facility and an area to sit with free WiFi, (free WiFi??? … happy dance, happy dance!!!) there is no public restroom … weird, I know. And the office isn’t open on weekends or after 4:00 any day of the week. So unusual and very strange.

Although the park is working fine for our needs, it may not be everyone’s cup of tea.

Earlier in the month, we befriended some folks here in the RV park who intended to stay for a month, but after two weeks, they decided to move on.

The fairgrounds itself no longer holds any active events, but it did come in handy serving as a temporary animal shelter during the Goodwin Fire.

unusual place to exercise

abandoned race track makes for an unusual place for Al and I to get in our exercise

Next to the fairgrounds is an abandoned race track. Yavapai Downs has been vacant for several years, but rumor has it, it has been purchased and the new owners hope to have it up and running by next summer.

Horse racing in Arizona

When we don’t have time to hit the amazing trails, and let me tell you,¬†the trails around here are seriously awesome, we use the race track to get in our steps.

abandoned race track

Yavapai Downs – unusual place to exercise

horse racing

Yavapai Downs – abandoned – smoke from the Goodwin Fire in early July

Not only have we pretended to be horses and briskly walked the track (now there’s a visual ūüėÜ), we use the stadium stairs as our personal¬†stairmaster. Yep, definitely an unusual place to exercise, but since it’s in my backyard and so convenient, I don’t have any excuses not to get in a workout.

unusual weather in Arizona

Monsoon season in Arizona – unusual and dramatic

We’ve been thoroughly enjoying our time in the Prescott, Arizona, area and with only a few more weeks to go before we get our wheels rolling again, we’ll be busy trying to squeeze in a few new explorations. Although considering it’s monsoon season around here, those plans may be curtailed. We’ve encountered some doozy storms which always brings about dramatic and unusual skies…. keeping us on our toes!

Prescott Arizona

Did you do any impulse buying on Amazon Prime Day? I know at least one person who did ūüėó

YI 4K Action Camera Bundled 3-Axis Gimbal Stabilizer Selfie Stick Bluetooth Remote Travel Case(US Edition) Night Black

A Solo Stroll

The monsoon season has officially arrived here in Prescott, Arizona. It’s curtailed my hiking and explorations somewhat, especially when there’s lightening present. But the drama in the sky is luring. The other afternoon I ventured out with no real plan in mind. With camera in hand, I thought I’d swing by one of my favorite spots in Prescott, Arizona … Watson Lake.

Watson Lake Prescott Arizona

It was late in the afternoon with ominous clouds looming. The park was relatively empty. I began aimlessly strolling down one trail and then down another. I was alone, but I was never really alone.

The quiet solitude allowed me to take in the sights and sounds around me. I was in my element, and if it hadn’t been for the severe storm, I could have stayed until nightfall. The highlight of my day was coming across a bobcat in the middle of the trail. She was on the hunt and very focused. She knew I was there, but could’ve cared less. She glanced at me once and immediately returned to focusing on her prey.

Lynx

108 mm – What a rare treat to come across this beautiful bobcat. She was in the middle of the trail and wasn’t about to move. She was intent on her hunt and very focused.

I waited and watched this elegant cat for awhile. However, she obviously exuded more patience than moi, and I soon found myself walking in another direction. I hadn’t ventured far when I heard her success. Tweetie bird’s beautiful chirping was halted in mid chirp along with some serious rustling of the bushes. I quickly swung back to the previous trail where I had spotted her, but saw no signs of the majestic cat. Although, I knew to keep a very safe distance, and didn’t walk past my original spot where I photographed her.¬† Ah, the circle of life!

A collage of what I saw along the trail that fine day illustrating I was never alone ……

Fingers crossed the storms aren’t too severe this afternoon and I can head back over to Watson Lake and visit with the locals while getting in some trail hiking. In lieu of exercise, I’ll settle for more shutter clicks ūüėĀ

Update – Oops in my exuberance to share these photos, I failed to do my homework on the cat I encountered along the trail. Because of the ears, I assumed it was a Lynx when in reality I believe it’s a bobcat. Thanks Laurel for pointing that out¬†ūüėŹ

This post was written in response to the WordPress photo challenge = collage

YI 4K Sports and Action Video Camera (US Edition) Night Black

Color of Spring in the Desert

Thanks to the unusual and excessive rainfall this past winter in the desert southwest, the hills have come alive.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen the Phoenix valley so green, but it’s not just an abundance of green that has carpeted the land.

hiking in Phoenix

Superstition Mountain – Apache Junction, Arizona

Everywhere I look, I’m greeted with a delightful kaleidoscope of color. The wildflowers are on steroids this year and I’m loving the view.¬† Each bloom, bush,¬†and tree¬†is a wonderful sight to behold.

poppies

me photographing the wildflowers

desert wildflowers

The stunning display of wildflowers is an unexpected surprise to those visiting the desert for the first time.  The desert southwest is lush with vegetation and color and a far cry from the drab, barren brown most folks associate with a desert.

Phoenix hiking

Spring hiking in the desert is the best!

desert wildflowers

I always look forward to spring in¬†Arizona, and couldn’t wait to share some of my favorite Phoenix valley spots with my daughter.¬†¬† First up was hiking at the Superstition Mountain¬†located on the far east side of the valley.¬†This is my absolute favorite place to hike in Arizona.

Superstition Mountain

My daughter – it was a glorious morning to hit the trails.

March 2nd – Al and I managed to snag a lovely campsite in the overflow loop for a couple of nights of dry camping at Lost Dutchman State Park.¬† This is a popular state park and without a reservation, it’s difficult to nab a site with electric.

Lost Dutchman State Park

Lost Dutchman State Park, Apache Junction, Arizona

By camping at the base of the Superstition Mountains, I was able to hike multiple times throughout the day and photograph the beauty that surrounded me. Sharing this amazing scenery with my daughter was a special treat.

wildflowers

Fields of poppies blooming at the base of the Superstitions

If you ever find yourself visiting Phoenix and looking for an entertaining way to spend a day, here’s a post I did a while back about the Apache Trail that you might find fun.

Lost Dutchman State Park

The desert provides the best skies

Who knew the desert could be so colorful?¬† ‘I know, I know’, she exclaimed with raised hand!¬† And once the wildflowers wither, it’ll be time for the cactus to bloom. The color of spring in the desert is a memorable and unique experience ….¬†not to be missed.desert wildflowers

CMT 1 Pair – Anti Shock / Hiking / Walking / Trekking Trail Poles

Pinty 2L Hiking Backpack Hydration Pack with Water Bladder Cycling Climbing Camping Bag (Pink)

Embracing Photography Failure

When I started this¬†blog¬†five years¬†ago, I was sharing photographs that were shot with a $79 Kodak digital point and shoot camera.¬† I didn’t know anything about photo editing or even that the photographs needed to be edited.¬† What came out of the camera got shared on the blog … as is.great blue heron

Like any newbie blogger, I was excited to get that first follow, that first like, and of course, that first comment.  As the months passed, I eagerly continued writing posts filled with photographs.  The comments and followers increased and I developed friendships, friendships that continue to this day.

sandOne day, I received a message.  An email message from a fellow blogger?  Oh, how exciting, I thought!

That¬†excitement was short-lived as¬†I read … “If you’re going to post pictures on your blog, the least you could do is a little photo editing.¬† There’s no excuse for sharing a photograph with a crooked horizon especially since there’s free editing software like Picasa that’ll fix it in a second.¬†

Oh and quit posting the photos so little.¬† If you’re going to share photos, then share photos so we can see them.¬† Don’t expect readers to click to enlarge because they won’t.¬† Nobody has time for that.¬† Aside from the poor pictures, nice blog“.

whooping cranesAll righty then …. I was heartbroken, mortified, and embarrassed.¬† How is it I was capable of building award-winning custom homes from conception to completion, and yet I knew nothing¬†about photo editing?

Quite frankly, my computer/technology skills¬†were basic at best, which drove¬†my business accountant crazy ūü§ď

Old school film seemed simple;  snap a bunch of pictures until the roll of film was full then take it to the drugstore to get it developed. Botta bing, botta boom!

poor photograph

FAIL – nice color, relatively sharp, but I didn’t keep panning and thus cut off his head

That message gnawed at me.  Editing?  Hmm!  Google and I became well acquainted.  Picasa was downloaded.  I started following blogs that focused on photography, along with all the RVing blogs I already followed.  As our RV travels increased, so did the photo taking AND sharing.  A slow and steady photographic evolution morphed.

Great Blue Heron

Better РGreat Blue Heron     ISO 100     F4     1/800       56.9mm  (35mm equivalent 312mm)

I’ve been humbled by many of¬†your¬†complimentary comments¬†lately¬†about my photography.¬† Through A LOT of trial and error, I do feel¬†it has¬†improved as¬†have my editing skills, but the compliments and questions¬†still surprise me.¬† I consider myself a novice, a beginner, a work in progress when it comes to photography.

With that said, I thought I’d share a little behind the scenes, or shall I say, behind the lens with you all, and show you¬†a few¬†of my photo fails and successes…. a¬†post about¬†what works for me, using simple and inexpensive camera gear.

ducks in-flight

Camera set on ‘shutter priority’.¬† ISO 200¬† F4.5¬†¬† 1/1600¬†¬† 54.5mm (35mm equivalent= 305mm)

I’m still a comedy of errors behind the lens, and fully embrace my tried and true method of ‘point and pray’ style of photography.¬† So this isn’t a detailed ‘how to’ post.¬† And if you consider yourself an¬†accomplished photographer, I always welcome critique cormorantand recommendations.¬† I’m actually grateful for that critical email message …. well, maybe ūüėČ

I’ve gone through the camera envy stage, and still do.¬†¬†When I see¬†amazing images on a blog post, I’ll ask the¬†blogger about their camera gear thinking if I use what they’re using my photographs will improve.¬† Or maybe if I spend more money on camera gear, I’ll capture better images.¬†¬†¬†We all know this isn’t necessarily¬†true!¬† We’ve all¬†seen stunning photographs taken with an iPhone and some very poor¬†photos taken with a DSLR.

Therefore, camera choice is personal, and the best camera to have, is the camera that you carry?Pelican

So what camera(s) do I¬†carry?¬† I¬†predominantly¬†use what’s referred to as a “Bridge” camera.¬† A bridge camera is more than a Point and Shoot, but not quite a DSLR.¬† Thus, a bridge between the two.¬†¬† There’s no lens changing with a bridge camera but¬†there are a lot of¬†customizing options.¬† I have a whole¬†page dedicated to cameras¬†if you’d like more detailed information.¬† I realize, whatever¬†camera I use, it’s important to learn how to¬†operate the equipment and know its capabilities and limitations.

shore birds

FAIL – I set camera on ‘program’ mode. Totally wrong setting for moving subject.¬† ¬†ISO 400¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† F4.0
shutter  1/100   causing a blurry mess         55.7mm (35mm equivalent 310mm)     No cropping

shore birds

Moderate FAIL РISO 400   F4.0    shutter 1/250    still too slow for moving subject    30.1mm (35mm = 167mm)shore birds different day   ISO 100   F4.5     shutter 1/1000      70.5mm (35mm equivalent 392mm)        No cropping

The built-in zoom on my Panasonic is marketed as a¬†25-600mm lens which allows me to shoot a wide-angle landscape¬†image one minute and then zoom in on wildlife within roseateseconds.¬† I love this flexibility, but it does have its drawbacks.¬† The quality of the photograph will never be on par with a DSLR and the crop factor is limiting.¬† It’s all about resolution, pixels, and sensor size.

I’ve¬†used this camera for three years and have learned its strengths AND its weaknesses and I know when I zoom in to that 600mm capability, I will lose image quality.¬† I also know its aperture sweet spot is F4.0 and it’s best not to take the ISO over 400.¬† There are also times it has trouble focusing,

heron

FAIL – even though the heron is in the center of the photo and¬† camera was set to a ‘center’ focal point,¬† camera had trouble focusing on the heron with all the vegetation ¬†ūüėí¬† It’s the camera, not me!¬†¬†Panny and I have been at odds lately!¬†¬†¬† ISO 100¬†¬†¬† F2.8 (even at F4.0 camera had difficulty focusing)¬†¬†¬† ¬†1/800¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† 107.8mm (592mm)

egret

ISO 100    F5.0    1/1600       108mm (600mm)    Fail on placement of Watermark. Not thrilled with composition!

How close am I to the birds and what lens am I using?¬† Hmm!¬† I have no clue on actual distance but I can share lens distance.¬†¬† Since I’m using a bridge camera, there’s no¬†specific lens to talk about, but I can share an equivalence to a DSLR.¬† If you note the info on each photo, I’ve shared the mm number.¬† Since I have a cropped sensor camera, the number in parentheses is the equivalent¬†if using a full frame camera.¬† If you don’t understand sensor size or why my camera or an iPhone will¬†never capture the image quality of a DSLR, here’s an enlightening article that might clarify.

bird photography

How do I capture birds in motion?¬†¬†For a Point and Shoot, I set the camera to the “sports” setting.¬† My little Sony P&S doesn’t offer¬†a sport setting¬†but it does have a “pet” setting that does ok.¬†Then set the camera on “burst” mode.¬† Multiple shots taken spoonbillat one time is key, but note,¬†point and shoot cameras can¬†be slow to process multiple shots and take a few seconds to recover and be¬†ready to snap again.¬† I’ll admit, I rarely use¬†the¬†Sony P&S for birds. Too challenging.

For my bridge camera, I prefer to set the camera on “shutter priority”.¬† I’ve tried using the “sports” setting and “aperture priority”, but wasn’t pleased with the results.¬† Every camera and user¬†is different.¬† Because I’ve photographed so many birds with my Panasonic, I have a pretty good handle on how fast my shutter needs to be for specific birds.¬†¬† For example; cranes and herons in-flight, the shutter¬†can be as low as 1/800 but for ducks, I need at¬†least 1/1600.¬† And I always¬†have the camera set on “burst” mode, taking at least three shots at a time.whooping crane

Yes, I do delete a lot of photographs, and I’m ok with that.¬† I also set the camera on continuous focus (AFC) and switch back and forth between a center focus point¬†versus multiple focus points.

cormorant

Cormorant¬† –¬† ISO 200¬†¬†¬† F4¬†¬†¬†¬† 1/800¬†¬†¬†¬† 46.5mm¬† (35 equivalent 290mm)

If my subject is holding still or I’m shooting landscapes, I’ll¬†alternate between¬†the¬†IA (intelligent auto) and P (program) settings.¬† I do acknowledge that the camera can often times be smarter than me.¬† Thus, I never feel badly using the camera in full auto mode.Killdeer

Whenever I’m photographing wildlife, I take a ton of photographs.¬† Remember, digital photography¬†is free.¬†So why not shoot away! ¬†It’s not uncommon for me to shoot 300 plus photographs¬†in a day,¬†and if the birding is really good, I might shoot as many as 1,000.¬† Out of those images, I¬†expect to¬†like¬†maybe 25.¬† By the way, I only shoot that volume of¬†photographs when it comes to wildlife.

sunrise

Camera set on Auto – unprocessed, right out of the camera. ¬†I still can’t hold my camera straight!

sunrise

exact same photo, but OVER processed for fun!

Photo processing РThis past January, I finally graduated in the editing department.  I jumped from Picasa to Photoshop Lightroom.  I know some folks think processing/editing is somehow trickery, but processing is necessary for optimal imagery.

It’s no different from film.¬† The roll of film was processed and pictures were developed from the negatives.¬† You wouldn’t walk around sharing the negatives.¬†¬†It’s the same with Lightroom or any other photo editing program.

Some folks like to over process a photograph for dramatic effect.¬† Most of the time, I try to keep the colors in my¬†photos to as close to what I see, to reality.¬† However, even Ansel Adams¬†played around with developing/processing.¬† It’s just another way to let the creative juices flow.

sunrise

image¬†right out of camera – no processing.¬† I finally activated the “grid lines” on¬†my camera to assist me¬†in achieving a straight horizon.¬† You’d think by now, I could hold my camera level ūüėí

bird in-flight

Same image processed; a little cropping & color adjusting. Is the horizon now slanting the other way? Geez!

Lately, I’ve been shooting more purposely.¬† You know, thinking about composition, accessing settings, and striving for a¬†compelling image.¬† All I can say to that is the delete black bellied whistling ducksbutton is working in overdrive and the fails far outweigh the wins more than ever before.¬† Ah, but isn’t that part of the fun and challenge of photography?¬† Hmm, maybe I’ll return to that ‘point and pray’ method¬† ūüėĄ

But the big question is always, “Are we¬†having fun yet?” You bet¬†I am, and my recommendation is whatever camera you’re using, whether you process or not, keep posting.¬† Don’t let¬†¬†anyone derail your creativity.

Cheers to sharing pictures – the good, the bad, and all the in-betweens!great blue herons

Tony Northrup’s DSLR Book: How to Create Stunning Digital Photography

Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ300K 12.1 Megapixel, 1/2.3-inch Sensor, 4K Video, Splash & Dustproof Body, Leica DC Lens 24X F2.8 Zoom (Black)